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How to Execute a Controlled Shot
Advantage Player
by Jerry Patterson

The reader may wish to refer to my earlier articles for introductory information on achieving an advantage at casino Craps by using dice control.

If you’re a right-handed shooter, throwing from stick-left, you will stand parallel to the table with the arm rail across your front mid-section. The forearm of your non-throwing arm will be flat along the chip rail for support. You will lean out over the table slightly so you can reach down with your throwing hand to set and pick up the dice. Your body will be facing the boxman.

If you are right-handed and throwing from stick-right, you will stand with your right side up against the arm rail, perpendicular to the table. You will directly face the stickman and your target area at the far wall. Your non-throwing left arm will probably be down by your side and out of the way. One thing that you may have noticed if you tried throwing right-handed from stick-right is that you are throwing over a greater distance. This is true because you are throwing across the front of your body plus the stickman’s body. You will discover that you are using some upper arm motion (pivoting about the shoulder) in order to deliver the dice.

With the right-handed shooter at stick-left, his right arm is already closest to the stickman (and the target area) and he is only throwing across the stickman’s body as he extends his arm towards the back wall. His forearm is pivoting about the elbow so he has a little less arm motion and a little less distance to cover. The right-handed, stick-left may be slightly preferred for these reasons, but both positions are excellent.

One caveat here for the stick-right or stick-left position—be careful not to throw the dice at an obtuse angle to the back wall. Your two-dimensional trajectory should be perpendicular to the far wall. In addition, your dice should bounce off the flat portion, not the corners of the back wall. When right-handed throwers shoot from stick-right, they tend to stand straight up, not getting out over the table at all. When this happens, they usually throw the dice in the front far corner (player’s side of the table). This rounded portion of the back wall is very undesirable to hit because it acts as a “mixing bowl,” thoroughly turning the dice over in multiple directions. The initial set relationship is destroyed.

You will have to lean out over the table a bit to avoid the rounded corners, yet come in perpendicular to the back wall. If you cannot meet both conditions, then you will have to be happy hitting the flat section of the back wall on a slightly skewed, or larger than 90-degree angle. To maintain control and avoid the losing “7” as long as possible, you must avoid hitting the rounded corners of the back wall.

This story was first published in the Winter 2002-2003 issue of Gambling Times Magazine.

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